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NASCAR Presents Wendell Scott’s Family with Custom Trophy Commemorating Historic 1963 Victory

Scott, the first Black man to win a race in NASCAR’s Cup Series, never got the trophy from his win at Jacksonville in 1963. Scott wasn’t even declared the winner immediately after the race. 

Wendell Scott passed Richard Petty with 25 laps remaining at Speedway Park in Jacksonville on Dec. 1, 1963, in the Jacksonville 200. But Buck Baker, who actually finished second, was declared the winner and received the trophy in Victory Lane.

Race officials discovered hours later that Scott was the actual winner and had lapped the entire field twice. But he was not credited with the victory for another two years, and his family has long pushed for a proper celebration.

“It matters because my father earned it and it was something he had to labor on,” Frank Scott said. “He always wanted to get his trophy and he predicted that he would get his trophy one day. He said, ‘I may not be here with you all, but one day I’ll get my trophy.'”

Scott retired because of injuries suffered in a 1973 crash at Talladega Superspeedway, and the Danville, Virginia, native died in 1990 of spinal cancer.

He was posthumously inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2015, two years after the city of Danville awarded Scott a historical marker. The statement on the marker praises Scott for “persevering over prejudice and discrimination, Scott broke racial barriers in NASCAR.” In a 13-year career, Scott notched 20 top-five finishes.

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